THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES, COMPASSION SATISFACTION AND COMPASSION FATIGUE OF THAI CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS

  • ปิยพงศ์ แซ่ตั้ง ภาควิชาจิตวิทยา คณะศึกษาศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยรามคำแหง
Keywords: Compassion Satisfaction, Compassion Fatigue, Professional activities, Thai Clinical Psychologists

Abstract

           The aims of this study was to investigate relationship among professional activities, compassion satisfaction, and compassion fatigue as well as to construct an equation to predict compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue using professional activities of Thai clinical psychologists. In this cross-sectional study, 204 Thai clinical psychologists representative were randomized by simple random sampling method. Data were collected during June to December 2017, Self-administered questionnaire consist of demographic data, characteristic of professional activities, and Professional quality of life, fifth edition (ProQOL-5) – Thai version were mailed out to clinical psychologists. The statistical analyses used are; frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient and stepwise multiple regression analysis. The results of this study are as follow

            Compassion satisfaction have positive correlation with Professional activities in four areas, Compassion fatigue: burnout have negative correlation with Professional activities in three areas, There was no relationship between Compassion fatigue: secondary trauma stress and professional activities. The professional activities in application of clinical psychology for community mental health services and related fields, and training and consultation can be used collectively to forecast compassion satisfaction at 12.1%, The professional activities in training and consultation can be used collectively to forecast burnout at 4%

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Published
2018-12-28
How to Cite
แซ่ตั้งป. (2018). THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES, COMPASSION SATISFACTION AND COMPASSION FATIGUE OF THAI CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS. Journal of Industrial Education, 17(3), 138-146. Retrieved from https://ph01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/JIE/article/view/148842
Section
Research Articles

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