The effect of industrial microwave power level on physical and chemical properties of semi-finished fish crackers

Abstract

Fried fish crackers have high-fat content and that are a risk for cancers. Including popular consumers prefer to buy food at a convenience stores that use microwaves to heat food because it's convenient and saves time. This research aimed to study puffing by microwaves of fish crackers on the physical and chemical properties of semi-finished fish crackers. The fish cracker of Datok and Narathiwat fish cracker in three southern border provinces puffed by microwave at the wave of 1,300 and 1,700 microwave power for 10, 20, and 30. It was seconded found that microwave power and time affecting brightness (L*) significantly different (p≤0.05).          The Datok and Narathiwat fish cracker products using waved at 1,700 microwave powers for 30 seconds were most appropriate for best of puffing and good quality as specified by the standard of fish cracker. The L* value of both fish crackers showed that decreased tendency followed with an increase of microwave power and time of puffed by microwave. While the value a* and b* increased tendency the colors red and yellow. When considering the puffing value of fish cracker increased with following microwave power and time increases, but same as moisture content and water activity (aw) were decreased. Puffing fish crackers by microwave show that moisture and aw were 2.51-3.47 % and 0.41-0.46. These products can increase the shelf life. The sensory quality of the product showed that both Datok fish crackers gave a higher overall score than Narathiwat fish crackers were 7.23 (like moderately) and 7.16 (like moderately), receptively. Therefore, fish crackers puffing by industry microwave power level was the taste, texture, smell similar which fried fish crackers and can further market expansion.

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Author Biography

Romlee lee Chedoloh, Yala Rajabhat University

Bio Statement 
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Published
2020-12-25
Section
Research Articles