Materiality and Sensibility: Phenomenological Studies of Brick As Architectural Material

Main Article Content

Tony Sofian
Iwan Sudradjat
Baskoro Tedjo

Abstract





An incessant challenge for the architects nowadays is how to design architectural projects that support the  creation of meaningful experiences, benefitting from the interconnection between building materiality and human sensibility. The purpose of this study is to provide a phenomenological understanding of brick as an architectural material and how people perceive its architectural space and interpret its architectural meaning.
Method of phenomenological analysis from Moustakas (1994) is adopted to guide the whole research procedures; using in-depth and multiple interviews with the users of three different buildings who shared experiences in inhibiting and interacting with the environment created with brick as an architectural material.





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How to Cite
Sofian, T., Sudradjat, I., & Tedjo, B. (2020). Materiality and Sensibility: Phenomenological Studies of Brick As Architectural Material. Nakhara : Journal of Environmental Design and Planning, 18, 1-10. Retrieved from https://ph01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/nakhara/article/view/233779
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Iwan Sudradjat, School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia

Professor, School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development, Institut Teknologi Verified email at ar.itb.ac.id - Homepage Architectural History Theory CriticismHistoriography of Indonesian ArchitectureResearch MethodologyGender & Architecture

Baskoro Tedjo, School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia

Ir. Baskoro Tedjo, MSEB., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Ir.(ITB), MSEB(Polytech U. New York), Ph.D.(Osaka University)

baskorotedjo@ar.itb.ac.id

Research interest:
Architectural design; environment and behavior

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