Residential to Commercial Area Development: The Case of Nimmanhemin, Chiang Mai, Thailand

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Chompoonoot Chompoorath
Hiroaki Kimura

Abstract

Nimmanhemin is a significant shopping area in Chiang Mai, where shopping areas developed from long-distance trade transport and developed into merchant communities, but Nimmanhemin began as a residential area and was later developed for commercial purposes. Therefore, Nimmanhemin represents a unique development. This study focuses on the spatial transformation from a residential area into a commercial area and aims to discover the factors impacting the development of the residential area into one of today’s most significant commercial areas in Chiang Mai, and study the adaptation of buildings which were not primarily created for commercial purposes. Even though the existing planning of the Nimmanhemin area does not provide public space, housing estate planning has the ability to adapt to the creation of new public spaces in commercial terms. In addition, architectural adaptation influences public spaces in the Nimmanhemin area.

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How to Cite
Chompoorath, C., & Kimura, H. (2017). Residential to Commercial Area Development: The Case of Nimmanhemin, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Nakhara : Journal of Environmental Design and Planning, 13, 73-88. Retrieved from https://ph01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/nakhara/article/view/104610
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Articles
Author Biographies

Chompoonoot Chompoorath, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Japan

Chompoonoot Chompoorath is a student of Doctoral Program in the Graduate School of Science and
Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Japan. She finished her undergraduate study at Faculty of
Architecture, Chiang Mai University (2009) and worked as architect designer in Thailand. Chompoonoot
completed Master of Architectural Design from Kyoto Institute of Technology (2015). Her current academic
focus is on Urban transformation that impacted to Architectural terms in case of shopping area in Chiang
Mai, Thailand.

Hiroaki Kimura, Department of Architecture and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Japan

Hiroaki Kimura is a professor of Architectural Design, Graduate school of Science and Technology
Kyoto Institute of Technology and he also works as architect at his own company “KS Architect” at Osaka,
Japan(1986-now)that using iron as a material of construction and especially in the potential of monocoque
steel sheet structure architectural form. (1979-1982)He was graduated from Glasgow Art School and Glasgow
University, Mackintosh School of Architecture.Admited M.Litt,Transfer to Ph.D, Ph.D Degree in 1982. And
2015 He has got Honor of Fellows The Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland.

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